How To Grow Turmeric Indoors

Here is a quick video I made about how I get my turmeric plants started!

For those who prefer it in text, the process is as follows:

  1. Soak turmeric root in water for 24 hours and leave in a warm, dark location until green spots or “eyes” have formed.
  2. Plant 1 inch deep in good potting soil (I use cactus soil)
  3. In 7-14 days you should have visible shoots coming off of your plant
  4. Transplant into an 18″ pot before the plant becomes root bound as this will prevent a good harvest.
  5. In 10 months,  harvest and enjoy your fresh turmeric!

Thanks for reading,

OOCH

Photo Source

Video: 53 Day Old Dragon Fruit Plants/ Pitaya From Seed!

Here is a quick video I have put together showing off some of my dragon fruit/ pitaya babies that I grew from seed on July 7! These guys are growing fast!

ALSO, I show off my baby Yellow Pitaya plants that I grew from seed as well.

 

If you missed my first how-to, you can watch here:

What is “True To Seed” and Why All Gardeners Need To Know

When you’re taking up gardening, it is important to choose the plants that you cultivate from seed carefully. You need to always keep in mind that the seeds of the plants don’t always grow fruit like the fruit the seed was taken from . That is why you have to always know if the variety you are trying to grow is worth attempting to start from seed. Today, we will speak about a specific type of seeds which are called True to Seed. We will go into the details of what exactly are these seeds.

 

What are true to seed plants?

True to seed plants grow in the exact same way as the original plant. An example is that when you’re taking the seed of a Brandywine tomato in order to plant another plant, the exact same plant will be growing. This will ensure that the plants which grow from the seeds are not hybrid at all.

These are the plants which are not impacted by cross-pollination. A squash grows the same kind of plant from seed, but the product can be swayed by pollination with a similar variety. That is why you will be able to get the exact same plant only if you are diligent with pollen. These days many of the seeds which are available in the market are actually hybrid seeds. They are deliberately cross-pollinatedin order to inculcate some of the useful features of another species of plants. These might include disease resistance or faster growth.

On the other hand, when you’re looking at the fruit trees as well, you will realize that they are often grafted. That is why, when you’re using the fruit seeds, they are also not true to seed. Thus, when you’re looking to plant the seeds, it is important to realize whether it is a hybrid seed or whether it is true to seed. Hybrid plants might have some unique characteristics but they often do not produce fruits and vegetables with the original features.

If you’re looking for organic gardening options, it is a much better idea to go with the true to seed options. With the help of these options, it will become easier for you to grow natural plants without any kind of cross-pollination. Even though, these plants might be a bit difficult to grow and you would have to take great care of these plants but still, these are the natural variants of their specieswhich is whyyou should opt for these seeds rather than any other.

The next time you’re obtaining seeds for your garden, do make sure that you keep these factors in mind.

Photo source

 

How To Grow More Herbs Than You Will Ever Need By Cloning

basil-iStock_84310823_XXXLARGELike fresh basil? Need More?

Everyone has seed those herb plants in grocery stores that look so lush and fresh, until 2 days and one use later it looks trampled and SAD. Its all a game, they aren’t giving us NEARLY enough to sustain our insatiable thirst for cilantro.

I have the ultimate solution: CLONING. and the process is EASY

  1. Buy pots of herb plants, whatever kinds you need. Cut all of the plants off near the base. Cut these into 3″ segments and remove the bottom leaves from each segment. You now have a LOT of segments.
  2. Prepare pots of basic potting soil by gently packing soil into small pots or cups.
  3. Place cuttings in the soil up to the first leaves, and press down the soil around them.
  4. Cover with plastic or place each pot in a plastic bag to encourage high moisture.
  5. In 1 week, remove from the bag.
  6. BOOM, let them grow for a few weeks and you’ve got a TON of branchy basil plants. Dividing up the cuttings encourages the new plants to grow super bushy and full. That means more leaves!

 

HAPPY GROWING,

OOCH

 

Papayas In Pots: A Failure

About a month ago I bought a few seeds of a rare dwarf variety of papaya.

Carica papaya v. ‘carinosa’

“I’ll grow this in the big window in a big pot” I thought.

No.

Let me elaborate.

 

The plants were potted in peat pellets and came up fine. As soon as roots became visible from beneath the pellet, I dropped these little guys into some pots, put them back where they were, and waited. I swear I didn’t do anything else wrong, guys. I swear.

Yet, in a week they were all dead.

I have read that papayas of any variety have a 0 tolerance policy for root disturbance, so my guess is that was the culprit. Next time I will sow the seeds directly into 18″ pots, which I have read is sufficient size to grow a small papaya plant. Also, I will supplement the light with a small red blue LED bulb, since I am not completely certain that that didn’t help kill the thing. You can get them really cheap on websites like Wish.com

I will keep you all posted as I go, but first I have to find the seeds at an affordable rate.